Four Ways To Get Great Client Testimonials

Online, it’s easy to pay to get a fancy website created that makes your company look like it’s super-professional and has done a lot of great work, but in reality, the design and layout, and even most of the content on a business website is just marketing.

It’s someone’s opinion of what the company WANTS to be, not necessarily what the company IS or how well it provides its services.

There are plenty of ways to position yourself as an expert online, and those are all very important, but there’s one piece of instant credibility that I, personally, lack on my own website and in my own documentation:

Testimonials from satisfied clients.

So, I’ve done some research today and am in the process of creating a “feedback form” that I will send off to clients each time a project has been completed and launched, or once every 3-6 months, whichever comes first.

The four things I’m following to (hopefully) get great testimonials are as follows:

#1: Ask For Feedback

Gramma used to say, “If it ain’t worth askin’ for, it ain’t worth gettin’!” and I’m going to take this advice to heart.  (love and miss you, Gramma)

#2: Find a middle ground between “too timid” and “too presumptuous”

When it comes to asking for feedback, it’s no good to ask wishy-washy, timid questions that get vague answers in return.  It’s also no good to presume that the client is going to write all positive things on that feedback form.

Ultimately, it’s best to ask solid questions and emotionally be able to handle the fact that sometimes the feedback won’t be “testimonial-worthy” and in fact will point out places that need improvement.

#3: Strike while the iron is HOT!

The best, and most natural time to get a testimonial from someone is when they’re actively telling you what they think of the project.  When you first show them the results of your work, and when your client is getting feedback from OTHERS about new results that you recently released.

It doesn’t matter if you’ve only been working with your client for a week. If they say something positive and testimonial-like, follow up by asking for their permission to use their words as part of your collection of testimonials from satisfied clients.

#4: Encourage your clients to sign up on LinkedIn

Testimonials posted on your website and in your marketing materials are a great idea, but having recommendations connected to your LinkedIn professional profile is much more powerful.

On your website or marketing materials, there’s very little to show the testimonials are from a real person.  On LinkedIn it’s easy to see just how linked in your clients are, and thus reflects how legitimate they are, too.

Do you have any more strategies and tips you think I should consider?  Love to hear from you!

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About TheWebGrrl

Social Media manager, writer, black belt, philosopher, coach. Helping small Canadian businesses grow using Social Media.

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